04.19.16 Wacky Wonderful Wednesdays!

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Standing out and becoming what your meant to be even in the toughest of circumstances still proves beautiful!

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Ronald Steiger's photo.

by Ronald Steiger

A son took his father to a restaurant to enjoy a delicious dinner. His Father was already a pretty old man, and therefore, a little weak, too. While he was eating, a little bit of food fell from time to time on his shirt and his trousers. The other diners watched the old man with their faces distorted by the disgust, but his son remained in total calm.

Once both guys were done eating, the son, without being remotely ashamed, (helped with absolute peace of mind) helped take his father to the toilet.

He cleaned up his leftovers from his wrinkled face, and tried to wash the stains of food from his clothes; lovingly combed his hair gray and finally cleaned his fathers glasses.

On the way out of the toilet, a profound silence reigned in the restaurant. No one could understand how is it that someone could do the ridiculous in such a manner. The Son was going to pay the bill, but before you leave, a man, also of advanced age, rose from the all diners and asked the son of the old man: ” don’t you think that you’ve left something here? ”

The young man replied: “No, I haven’t missed anything”. Then the stranger said to him :” Yes you’ve left something!

You left here a very important lesson for each child, and a hope for every father!” The entire restaurant was so quiet, you could hear a pin drop.

One of the biggest honors that exist, is being able to take care of those older adults who cared for us too. Our parents, and all those elderly who sacrificed their lives, with all of their time, money and effort. They deserve our utmost respect. If you also feel respect for older adults, share this story with all your friends.

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Sintra, Portugal

The charming town of Sintra is often recognized for its 19th-century Romantic architecture and the royal estates and castles. The Pena National Palace sits on top of a hill above the city and can be seen from Lisbon on a clear day.

Sintra, Portugal

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Avenue of the Baobabs, Madagascar

This alley of towering baobab trees lines the dirt road in the Menabe region of Madagascar and has become one of the most popular spots for tourists in the area.

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Love Notes

A young child’s after school art project turns into a celebration of love for the whole family.

It’s been over eleven years now. It was a wintry afternoon, the snow swirling around the cedar trees outside, forcing little icicles to form at the tips of the deep green foliage clinging to the branches.

My older son, Stephen, was at school, and Reed, my husband, at work. My three little ones were clustered around the kitchen counter, the tabletop piled high with crayons and markers. Extra long sheets of white paper stretched across the counter as far as their tiny arms could reach. The baby was sound asleep in his crib as Tom, Laura, and Sam labored to create works of art to be shown to Daddy at dinnertime. Tom was perfecting a paper airplane, creating his own insignia with stars and stripes, while Sam worked on a self-portrait, his chubby hands drawing first a head, then legs and arms sticking out where the body should have been. The children mostly concentrated on their work, Tom occasionally tutoring his younger brother on exactly how to make a plane that would fly the entire length of the room.

But Laura, our only daughter, sat quietly, engrossed in her project.

Every once in a while she would ask how to spell a name of someone in our family, then painstakingly form the letters one by one. Next, she would add flowers with small green stems, complete with grass lining the bottom of the page. She finished off each with a sun in the upper right hand corner, surrounded by an inch or two of blue sky. Holding them at eye level, she let out a long sigh of satisfaction.

“What are you making, Honey?” I asked.

She glanced at her brothers before looking back at me.

“It’s a surprise,” she said, covering up her work with her hands.

Next, she taped the top two edges of each sheet of paper together, trying her best to create a cylinder. When she had finished, she disappeared up the stairs with her treasure.

It wasn’t until later that evening that I noticed a “mailbox” taped onto the doors to each of our bedrooms. There was one for Steve. There was one for Tom. She hadn’t forgotten Sam or baby Paul. My heart softened when I saw that Reed and I had one pasted to our door as well, complete with lopsided hearts.

For the next few weeks, we received mail on a regular basis. There were little notes confessing her love for each of us. There were short letters full of tiny compliments that only a seven-year-old would notice. I was in charge of retrieving baby Paul’s letters, page after page of colored scenes including flowers with happy faces.

“He can’t read yet,” she whispered. “But he can look at the pictures.”

Each time I received one of my little girl’s gifts, it brightened my heart.

I was touched at how carefully she observed our moods. When Stephen lost a baseball game, there was a letter telling him she thought he was the best ballplayer in the whole world. After I had a particularly hard day, there was a message thanking me for my efforts, complete with a smiley face tucked near the bottom corner of the page.

One night, just as my husband and I were winding down, readying for bed, I looked across from my room and into the hall. I stared at the mailbox that Laura had made for herself. Suddenly, I realized that our little angel’s mailbox had sat empty all the while the rest of us had enjoyed her love notes. My eyes filled with tears.

Seeing my distress, Reed immediately questioned me about what was troubling me.

A thick lump locked in my throat as I pointed to her empty box. Without saying a word, he knew exactly what I was trying to tell him.

He brushed my hair off my forehead and planted a kiss on my furrowed brow.

“I’ll take care of it,” he said.

In the weeks that followed, this little girl and her daddy exchanged the sweetest of love notes.

“I love your eyes, Honey,” he’d write. “I noticed how kind you were to baby Paul.” “Thanks for letting Sam have his way this time. It shows how grown up you are.”

In return, her tiny hands penned words of love and support for him, how she loved to see him after a long day of work and how much his tucking her into bed at night meant.

This same little girl is grown now, driving off every day to the community college. But some things about her have never changed. One afternoon only a week or so ago, I found a love note next to my bedside.

“Thanks for always being there for me, Mom,” it read. “I’m glad that we’re the best of friends.”

I couldn’t help but remember the precious child whose smile has brought me countless hours of joy throughout the years. There are angels among us. I know. I live with one.

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THIS WEEK’S THREE FAVORITE PHOTOS

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MOMMY AND ME

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Reach out to someone in need this week!

Let others see Jesus in you this week!

Be His light in the darkness this week!

Have a Blessed Week!

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Click on the links below to go there!

Dora and the Explorers published randomly

Some Things I Learned About Alzheimer’s published randomly

One thought on “04.19.16 Wacky Wonderful Wednesdays!

  1. Oh Rosalyn, thank you so much for the wonderful smiles and chuckles you gave me today! I loved the pictures of the momma’s and their babies . . . but the quote about getting up and making sound effects made me laugh out loud.

    My first job on campus 24 years ago was with a lady by the name of Barbara Allen. I always noticed that when she would bend over or stand up from a sitting position that she would make a noise. I use to think “why does she always do that?” Now that I’m in my 60’s, I’ve found the answer to my question. 😅

    I hope you and Roy are doing well and are having many wonderful adventures.

    Becky

    On Wed, Apr 20, 2016 at 10:34 AM, Wacky Wonderful Wednesdays wrote:

    > Rosalyn Chauvin posted: ” Standing out and becoming what your meant to > be even in the toughest of circumstances still proves beautiful! > https://www.facebook.com/JamieJanover.artist.profile/videos/10153559078393907/ > by Ronald” >

    Like

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